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Article
November 28, 1931

THE TREATMENT OF POLIOMYELITISRESULTS IN A SERIES OF ONE HUNDRED AND FOUR CASES

Author Affiliations

Research Fellow of the Fleischner Fund for the Study, Prevention and Treatment of Communicable Diseases in Childhood SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Communicable Diseases, Children's Hospital, and the Pediatric Department of the University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1931;97(22):1620-1624. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730220042011
Abstract

The ability of serum containing actively antiviral substances to affect the course of poliomyelitis after symptoms have appeared is a consideration of utmost importance in the treatment of the disease with convalescent or other serum. In comparison to this major consideration, dosage and method of administration are probably of secondary significance.

Serum of human beings and monkeys convalescent from the disease has been shown to have definite antiviral properties1 and if injected into monkeys before the intracerebral inoculation of virus or if mixed with virus so injected will definitely prevent the development of characteristic symptoms. The crucial tests of therapeutic usefulness cannot be carried out in monkeys, since these animals are relatively insusceptible to the disease and develop it only in response to the highly artificial inoculation of massive doses of virus. The experimental disease thus produced runs a course which cannot be greatly influenced by subsequent injection of

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