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Article
December 12, 1931

PARIS

JAMA. 1931;97(24):1810. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730240060023

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Abstract

The Congress of Pediatricians  The seventh Congrès des pédiatres de langue française was held recently in Strasbourg, under the chairmanship of Professor Rohmer. The first topic on the program was "Alimentary Fevers in Infants." Professor Schaeffer considered the various theories advanced in explanation of these fevers. He regards as the true cause the increase of the metabolism of substances that fix water, and more particularly the proteins. He maintains that there is no alimentary fever without absolute or relative dehydration. It is possible that, as a result of dehydration, there develops an action of poisons affecting the regulatory nerve centers. With a diet rich in albuminoids, such as dry milk, the combustion of proteins liberates less water than the combustion of carbohydrates. The heat produced is greater and is eliminated through perspiration, which creates a need for water. At the same time, these proteins leave a large quantity of urea,

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