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Article
December 19, 1931

THE NATURE AND ORIGIN OF THE PIGMENTED STREAKS CAUSED BY SEPARATION OF THE CHOROID

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

JAMA. 1931;97(25):1873-1877. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730250031010
Abstract

It is well known that on ophthalmoscopic examination pigmented streaks are sometimes seen in the fundus in cases in which there has been postoperative separation of the choroid. The streaks are black, have a granular appearance, and may show breaks in continuity. They may be straight or slightly wavy, of various lengths, and quite numerous. Not infrequently they branch. The largest may have about twice the width of a large retinal vein. They are most abundant at the periphery of the fundus, and many of them extend to the limit of the ophthalmoscopic field. Seldom do they reach as near as 2 or 3 mm. to the optic disk. Most of them are more or less meridional in direction and tend to be parallel to one another, but some run in a circular course. In the region of the streaks the fundus may show pale areas and scattered pigment dots.

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