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Article
January 2, 1932

TREATMENT OF EYE BURNS PRODUCED BY TEAR GAS (CHLORACETOPHENONE)

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Rush Medical College.

JAMA. 1932;98(1):45-46. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27320270001012
Abstract

The recent innovation of a fountain pen "anti" bandit gun has led to several painful accidents from the discharge of the tear gas into the faces of children. Tear gas is a common name for chloracetophenone (C6H5COCH2Cl), which was first prepared in 1887, but was of no importance until used in chemical warfare. It is a white or gray crystalline solid, having a sweet, aromatic odor like locust blossoms. It is a stable compound having a melting point of 59 and a boiling point of 247 C. It has a specific gravity of 1.334 at 0 C. The vapor pressure is low, being 0.0028 at 0 C. It is insoluble in water but very soluble in organic solvents. During the World War it was used in shells, hand grenades, candles, the 4 inch Stokes motor and air bombs.

Lacrimation is produced by a concentration

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