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Article
January 9, 1932

A CASE OF POSTOPERATIVE PROGRESSIVE GANGRENE OF THE SKIN

Author Affiliations

South Bend, Ind.

JAMA. 1932;98(2):138-139. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27320280002011a
Abstract

History.  —F. R., a man, aged 32, an American, married, was admitted to the hospital, Aug. 30, 1930, complaining of malaise, chills and moderate abdominal distress. Shaking chills were experienced at intervals of from three to nine hours for a day prior to admittance. These symptoms appeared after a long and strenuous game of tennis. There were no gastro-intestinal symptoms other than dull pain over the entire lower part of the abdomen. No cardiac, respiratory or nervous symptoms were present. The past history was irrelevant, except for malaria eight years before while in the South. The family history was negative.

Physical Examination.  —The patient was tall, was of esthetic type, and appeared to be in good general health. The head, neck, chest, heart and extremities presented no abnormalities. The abdomen was scaphoid and without rigidity or palpable masses. There was, however, slight discomfort on deep pressure throughout both lower quadrants.

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