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Article
January 9, 1932

ADDISON'S DISEASE FROM SELECTIVE DESTRUCTION OF THE SUPRARENAL CORTEX

JAMA. 1932;98(2):145. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730280053015
Abstract

Addison's disease is usually associated with tuberculosis of the suprarenal glands; rarely it is due to neoplasms, infarction, amyloid disease or congenital malformation of the glands. Since there is almost complete destruction of the suprarenal glands in these conditions, information is not available concerning the extent to which the clinical picture depends on loss of the cortical function or on destruction of the medulla. In about 10 per cent of the cases of Addison's disease there is found a selective destruction of the cortical elements alone. In these cases the medulla is in such a state of preservation that, as far as morphologic evidence permits one to judge, it should be able to function adequately. Brenner,1 in an analysis of forty-three cases of this type, noted that in no case did Addison's disease depend on the destruction of the medulla with the cortex left approximately intact; at least no

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