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Article
January 16, 1932

THE THEBESIAN VESSELS AND THE NUTRITION OF THE HEART

JAMA. 1932;98(3):233-234. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730290049014
Abstract

The belief that the heart is totally dependent on the coronary arteries for its nutritive supply is quite firmly intrenched in the medical mind. The numerous cases of speedy death following sudden closure of the coronary vessels as well as the rapidity with which cardiac infarction occurs when a branch of a coronary artery is thrombosed or experimentally ligated has lent strong support to this view. Nevertheless, the pathologist often finds coronary arteries so narrowed by disease that they could have supplied little or no blood to their respective areas in the myocardium, yet infarction had not occurred. Undoubtedly a small number of cases in which closure of the coronary arteries fails to produce infarction may be explained by the presence of abnormal arterial anastomoses, which are occasionally found to be present in hearts. But how is one to explain those instances in which both coronary arteries are completely occluded

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