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Article
February 6, 1932

LABORATORY INFECTION IN MAN BY THE SPIROCHAETA PALLIDA OF EXPERIMENTAL RABBIT SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

Louisville, Ky.

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Louisville School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1932;98(6):479. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27320320001009
Abstract

Ever since the successful transmission of syphilis from man to the ape and to the rabbit in the early part of the present century, there has existed the question of whether the pathogenicity of Spirochaeta pallida for man is altered or abolished by a long period of residence in the body of the experimental host or by numerous successive animal passages of the spirochete. There are a few reports in the literature relative to this matter. Thus, Metchnikoff and Roux1 believed that they were able to attenuate the virulence of Spirochaeta pallida for man by from eleven to twenty-two successive passages in the monkey. In a laboratory assistant who became infected accidentally and in an elderly patient who was inoculated, with her consent, initial lesions developed, but both patients failed to show secondary manifestations. These data, showing only that Spirochaeta pallida retained its pathogenicity for man, are inadequate to

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