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Article
August 3, 1935

EFFECT OF CHOLECYSTECTOMY ON HEPATIC AND RENAL FUNCTION

JAMA. 1935;105(5):370-371. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760310044013
Abstract

Although much information is available regarding the functions of the gallbladder, there are still certain phenomena apparently related to the activity of this structure that remain unsolved. Particularly is this true in the case of certain metabolic disturbances that may follow the removal of the gallbladder, most notable among which are alterations in hepatic and renal function. At first thought it seems improbable that the mere removal of the gallbladder, a structure known to be nonessential to mammalian life and presumably functioning chiefly in the concentration and storage of bile, should exert any deleterious effects on other organs. However, instances of serious postoperative morbidity and even death following simple cholecystectomy have been described in patients who were apparently in good condition before operation. The most careful preoperative examination may fail to reveal any significant hepatic or renal functional impairment; cholecystectomy may be performed without undue trauma; the anesthesia may not

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