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August 10, 1935

TREATMENT OF INTRACTABLE NASAL HEMORRHAGE BY INJECTIONS OF MOCCASIN SNAKE VENOM

JAMA. 1935;105(6):412-413. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760320014006
Abstract

The use of moccasin venom for the treatment of bleeding was introduced by Peck in 1931. The rationale of this form of treatment was based on the observations of Peck and Sobotka1 in 1931 that animals could be made resistant to the experimental purpura known as the Shwartzman phenomenon by previous injections of moccasin venom. Since Peck could not demonstrate any circulating antibodies in the blood serum that would explain this antihemorrhagic effect, and since large doses of antivenin did not influence the course of the Shwartzman phenomenon, he deduced that the antihemorrhagic effect was probably produced through a direct action on the vessel walls.

In studying the factor or factors in moccasin and other snake venoms that were responsible for the resistant state in rabbits as far as the Shwartzman phenomenon was concerned, Peck2 observed that the antihemorrhagic factor was entirely independent of the neurotoxins and hemorrhagins

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