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Article
September 21, 1935

THE TREATMENT OF MILK ALLERGY AND ITS BASIC PRINCIPLES

JAMA. 1935;105(12):934-939. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760380010003
Abstract

Hypersensitiveness to milk presents a problem of general interest, although it may be of more immediate concern to the pediatrician. Its manifestations are many and include conditions varying from the mildest to the most severe forms of gastro-intestinal disturbances, eczema, urticaria, asthma, mucous colitis, migraine, acne, marasmus and pylorospasm. The foreign literature particularly has been replete with studies by such eminent pediatricians as Schlossmann, Finkelstein, Hutinel, Finizio, Barbier and Weill-Hallé, who have stressed the importance of the consideration of milk allergy in the field of infant feeding and who have cited cases which have eventuated either in most severe shock reactions or even acute anaphylactic death from the ingestion of milk. Moro1 and Bauer2 first described cases of marasmus due to milk intolerance and showed that this condition could largely be attributed to immunologic disturbances resulting from the entrance of the milk proteins into the blood stream. Schloss

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