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August 29, 1936

LIP READING AND THE INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENT OF THE HARD OF HEARING CHILD

Author Affiliations

WEBSTER GROVES, MO.

JAMA. 1936;107(9):648-650. doi:10.1001/jama.1936.02770350016006
Abstract

Recent surveys in the public school system of the United States revealed that three million of the fifty million school children, or 6 per cent, have imperfect hearing.1 Also it is believed that deafness is on the increase despite the rapid progress made by all institutions interested in checking this defect.

Why should educational institutions be concerned with the hard of hearing child? Because his handicap segregates him from the normal child, making him less fit to develop into a helpful citizen in his adult years.

This paper is a preliminary presentation of the scholastic and personality changes attendant on the irremediably hard of hearing child. Although he may not realize it, much of ordinary conversation is missed at home, at school and at play. His parents nag him for inattention and his teachers brand him "hard to teach."

He often develops an inferiority complex or becomes an introvert

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