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October 28, 1939

SULFANILAMIDE IN STAPHYLOCOCCIC SEPTICEMIATWO CASES WITH RECOVERY

JAMA. 1939;113(18):1638-1639. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.72800430001008
Abstract

Staphylococcic septicemia has long been considered as almost invariably fatal, and the finding of staphylococci in the blood stream of a patient with septicemia has led to the rendition of many a hopeless prognosis.

The recent introduction of sulfanilamide, and its use in infections of all types, has been of interest to all medical practitioners.

We have found one report of staphylococcic septicemia successfully treated with sulfanilamide. Morris1 reports the use of antitoxin, transfusions and sulfanilamide for treating a white man aged 37 whose blood cultures showed Staphylococcus albus on four occasions.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A white man, aged 31, was admitted to the Charleston General Hospital, Aug. 17, 1938, with the history of having jabbed the end of a pick into his knee nine days before admission while working as a coal miner. The patient noticed that shortly afterward the knee became painful and swollen. His

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