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January 20, 1940

Injuries of the Nervous System Including Poisonings

Author Affiliations

By Otto Marburg, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, and Max Helfand, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry, Columbia University. Cloth. Price, $3. Pp. 213, with 16 illustrations. New York: Veritas Press, 1939.

JAMA. 1940;114(3):277-278. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810030077033

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This book is not easy to read. One must reread the sentences in order to get the thought that the writers wish to convey. Many of the sentences are wobbly. An example is on page 17: "It is not usual to speak of general signs in brain injuries, but there are many symptoms which are commonly found in concussion, contusion as well as in compression. So it seems to be right to call such symptoms 'general symptoms'." Or on page 16: "These projectiles are potentially restless in the brain and thus are a continuous source of infection." In reference to the subject of blood pressure, on page 23 the following sentence appears: "Blood pressure is seldom examined immediately following an injury." In well regulated hospitals the house staff is instructed to make routine blood pressure readings on all types of injuries. Thus, the foregoing sentence is not entirely correct. In

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