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April 6, 1940

THE EFFECT OF QUICK FREEZING ON THE NUTRITIVE VALUES OF FOODS

JAMA. 1940;114(14):1356-1361. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.62810140015016
Abstract

The development of methods for the rapid reduction of the internal temperatures of food materials to very low levels has resulted in a phenomenal growth of the frozen food industry during the past ten years. According to the United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce,1 the quantity of quick-frozen foods in 1937 was more than 273,000,000 pounds, and an increase of 47 per cent was estimated for 1938, which would raise the production to 480,000,000 pounds. Of the total quantity marketed in 1937, approximately 50 per cent consisted of vegetables, of which nearly half were peas, 12 per cent of chicken and poultry, 12 per cent of fish, 11 per cent of fruits, of which more than half were strawberries, 9 per cent of beef and 2 per cent of lamb.2 Fish, because of the necessity of preserving the product even for almost immediate consumption, was the

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