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May 11, 1940

TREATMENT OF TRAUMATIC THROMBOSIS OF THE BRACHIAL ARTERY BY INTERMITTENT VENOUS OCCLUSION

JAMA. 1940;114(19):1863-1864. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.62810190001007
Abstract

Early descriptions of a "reactive hyperemia" are found in the writings of Cohnheim1 and Lister.2 This phenomenon displays itself in a bright blush of the skin with an increased volume of the pulse after an obstruction to the circulation has been released. They believed this reaction to be due to a vasomotor paralysis of the nerves produced by the obstructing tourniquet. This view was proved to be untenable by Bier.3 He showed that all connections between the limb and the body could be severed excepting the artery itself and the reaction would still occur. He stated that a collateral circulation could be established in areas to which the vessels had been occluded by promoting a reactive hyperemia. Lewis and Grant4 studied the effects of vascular occlusion and found that there resulted an increase in arterial amplitude following the release of vascular occlusion. They showed that the

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