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June 22, 1940

Men Against Madness

Author Affiliations

By Lowell S. Selling, M.D., Ph.D. Cloth. Price, $3.50. Pp. 342, with 42 illustrations. New York: Greenberg. Publisher, 1940.

JAMA. 1940;114(25):2497. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810250071036

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By a series of biographies and historical anecdotes Dr. Lowell Selling traces the development of our modern methods of treating diseases of the mind. It becomes quickly apparent that physicians recognized from the first the intimate relationship of mind and body, although there were innumerable tendencies toward separating the consideration of their disturbances. As long as human beings believe in magic, it was certain that mental conditions would be treated from the point of view of the magician. Then came Pinel, who struck the chains from the insane. Scientific progress was also inhibited to some extent by the charlatans, although these charlatans themselves did help to advance study of the mind. Prominent, of course, are Gall, who founded phrenology, and Mesmer, who developed animal magnetism. Coincidentally came the great discoveries of the scientists who dealt with the structure and function of tissues, psychologists and psychiatrists. The modern era culminates, of

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