[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.124.106. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 7, 1963

UNITED KINGDOM

JAMA. 1963;186(10):969. doi:10.1001/jama.1963.03710100107054

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Infections in Hospitals "Getting Worse.  "—R. E. M. Thompson, bacteriologist at the Middlesex Hospital, says that infections acquired in hospitals are a very real problem. "The situation is deteriorating rather than improving, and everybody who has studied the matter is worried about the future." He told a conference called by the Royal Society of Health that since the war the cleaning of hospitals had become a problem for a number of reasons. Although there had been an increase in the number of patients and operations, there had not been a comparable increase in the size of cleaning staffs. Operating rooms "are in use so constantly

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×