[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.176.35. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Viewpoint
July 25, 2012

HIV/AIDS in 1990 and 2012From San Francisco to Washington, DC

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

JAMA. 2012;308(4):345-346. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.7855

In 1990, the International AIDS Conference was last held in the United States. The US Food and Drug Administration had approved only 1 antiretroviral drug to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (zidovudine, approved in 1987 [Figure]). Highly active antiretroviral therapy, which has made it possible to reduce the risk of HIV transmission and for infected individuals to live longer and healthier, was still 5 years in the future.1 The AIDS epidemic remained very much out of control in the United States and around the world. Each year brought many more infections and deaths, and the expanding pandemic threatened to overwhelm the capacity for an effective response.

×