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Care of the Aging Patient: From Evidence to Action
Clinician's Corner
September 26, 2012

Caring for the Older Person With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Author Affiliations
 

Care of the Aging Patient Section Editor: Edward H. Livingston, MD, Deputy Editor, JAMA.

Author Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (Drs Fried and Vaz Fragoso); Clinical Epidemiology Research Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Washington, DC (Drs Fried and Vaz Fragoso); and Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (Dr Rabow).

JAMA. 2012;308(12):1254-1263. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.12422
Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common disease in elderly patients, is characterized by high symptom burden, health care utilization, mortality, and unmet needs of patients and caregivers. Respiratory failure and dyspnea may be exacerbated by heart failure, pulmonary embolism, and anxiety; by medication effects; and by other conditions, including deconditioning and malnutrition. Randomized controlled trials, which provide the strongest evidence for guideline recommendations, may underestimate the risk of adverse effects of interventions for older patients with COPD. The focus of guidelines on disease-modifying therapies may not address the full spectrum of patient and caregiver needs, particularly the high rates of bothersome symptoms, risk of functional and cognitive decline, and need for end-of-life care planning. Meeting the many needs of older patients with COPD and their families requires that clinicians supplement guideline-recommended care with treatment decision making that takes into account older persons' comorbid conditions, recognizes the trade-offs engendered by the increased risk of adverse events, focuses on symptom relief and function, and prepares patients and their loved ones for further declines in the patient's health and their end-of-life care. A case of COPD in an 81-year-old man hospitalized with severe dyspnea and respiratory failure highlights both the challenges in managing COPD in the elderly and the limitations in applying guidelines to geriatric patients.

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