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Editorial
April 10, 2013

Long QT Syndrome Susceptibility Mutations and Pregnancy LossAnother Piece of a Still Unfinished Puzzle?

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

JAMA. 2013;309(14):1525-1526. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.3373

Loss of a pregnancy is a lifelong trauma for a family. Among the 6 632 000 pregnancies in the United States in 2006, an estimated 1 124 000 spontaneous fetal losses occurred, including miscarriages (losses before the 20th week of gestation) and stillbirths (losses at 20 weeks or later), as extrapolated from reports of recognized pregnancies in the National Survey of Family Growth.1 In the same year, 25 972 stillbirths were reported through a different mechanism, the national vital statistics system.2 But regardless of reporting methods, the scope of the problem is large.

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