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Article
June 4, 1898

PATHOLOGY OF TUBERCULOUS GLANDS OF THE NECK; THEIR EARLY AND COMPLETE REMOVAL.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY AND CLINICAL SURGERY IN THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE; SURGEON TO THE PHILADELPHIA AND ST. AGNES HOSPITALS. PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(23):1321-1322. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440750009002

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Abstract

That form of adenitis so frequent during adolescence and middle age, wherein tubercle bacilli invade the lymphatic glands of the neck, is one of the most important pathologic conditions which come to the observation of the surgeon. The infection of tuberculosis, and its local development in the lymphatic glands of the neck, naturally presents the strongest grounds for fearing the dissemination of the infection to other and more important structures in the body. These enlarged glands may retain their hyperperplasia a varying length of time, but during this time the toxins generated on the spot are absorbed to the detriment and weakening of various structures in the body. The subsequent acute infection, due to streptococci, invades the tuberculous gland, transforming it into an acute abscess, which sometimes brings a spontaneous termination of the tuberculous development. This lymph-adenitis may be limited to some of the superficial or may exist in the

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