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Editorials
January 4, 1965

THE ROLE OF THE PHYSICIAN IN THE PESTICIDE PROBLEM

JAMA. 1965;191(1):45. doi:10.1001/jama.1965.03080010051017
Abstract

Scientific journals have published over many years the results of research directed toward assessment of the health hazards of pesticides. Yet, the response of the people and their electorate to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring1 was that neither physicians nor lay people know enough about the relative toxicity and hazards of pesticides. Some felt that they had not been told enough of what is being done to protect their health from damage by pesticides. On May 15, 1963, the President's Science Advisory Committee published a report on the use of Pesticides, with recommendations intended to correct this situation. Even before that report, both industry and government had increased the amount of research, the safety factors regulating the sale and application of pesticides, and the flow of information to the people on the benefits and hazards of pesticides.

After Silent Spring condemned the use of pesticides, the industrial, scientific, and public

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