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JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis
September 11, 2013

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Stroke Recovery

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Geriatric Medicine, Royal Infirmary, Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • 2Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • 3Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • 4Mental Health and Chronic Disease Program, Neurological and Mental Health Division, The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • 5The University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, United Kingdom
JAMA. 2013;310(10):1066-1067. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.107828
Abstract

Clinical Question  Are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) associated with better recovery after stroke?

Bottom Line  SSRIs may be associated with improved recovery after stroke, even in persons without depression. However, much of the evidence is of poor quality. Large, high-quality trials are needed to evaluate the validity of the current evidence and improve precision of estimates of any treatment benefits.

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