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JAMA Revisited
February 5, 2014

Hypertension as an Expression of the Lack of the Well-Balanced Life

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Copyright American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.


JAMA. 1919;73( (25) ):1886-- 1887.


December 20, 1919

JAMA. 2014;311(5):530. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.279313

Within comparatively few years the sphygmomanometer has won a permanent place in the armamentarium of the physician. Like other instruments of precision, it has enriched the technic of diagnosis and made therapy more easily evaluated. Systolic and diastolic pressures and the difference between them known as pulse pressure have become something definite. Hypotension and hypertension have attained a familiar sound even among laymen; so that a well known physician, referring to the ease with which high blood pressure can now be discovered, said of the use of the manometer: “I think any social worker would be better for knowing it and could learn it in fifteen minutes. For though one of the simplest, it is the most important of all medical tests.”1

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