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Editorial
August 20, 2008

Preventing Ventilator-Associated PneumoniaCould Silver-Coated Endotracheal Tubes Be the Answer?

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Service de Réanimation Médicale, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France; Institut de Cardiologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris.

JAMA. 2008;300(7):842-844. doi:10.1001/jama.300.7.842

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the intensive care unit (ICU)–associated infection most frequently acquired among patients receiving mechanical ventilation and is responsible for approximately 50% of all antibiotics prescribed in this setting.13 Because VAP has been associated with increased morbidity, longer hospital stays, increased health care costs, and higher mortality rates, prevention of this infection is a major challenge for all ICU personnel.1,2,4,5 Numerous preventive strategies have been tested, and updated recommendations have been published.69 However, evaluation of the effect of such interventions is a complex issue.

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