[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.176.35. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 154
Citations 0
news@JAMA
February 19, 2014

From JAMA’s Daily News Site

JAMA. 2014;311(7):665. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.574

Health disparities among US population subgroups remain one of the biggest challenges in medicine and public health, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For example, death rates from heart disease and stroke have declined overall, but premature cardiovascular deaths among non-Hispanic blacks remain 50% higher than among non-Hispanic whites. The US infant mortality rate declined 10% from 2005 to 2010 but it is highest among non-Hispanic black women—more than twice that of non-Hispanic white women. Outcomes that vary greatly by race, sex, and other factors drive the US lag behind many other nations in life expectancy and quality.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×