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Editorial
February 26, 2014

Nonspecific Effects of Vaccines

Author Affiliations
  • 1Immunobiology Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • 2Immunisation, Hepatitis and Blood Safety Department, Public Health England, Colindale, London, United Kingdom
JAMA. 2014;311(8):804-805. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.471

Vaccination is one of the great public health achievements of the last 100 years.1 The development of vaccination has led to the eradication of smallpox, the reduction of the worldwide incidence of polio by 99%, and the control of measles, with a 74% decline in global measles deaths since 2000.2

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