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Books, Journals, New Media
June 24, 1998

Yellow FeverA Melancholy Scene of Devastation: The Public Response to the 1793 Philadelphia Yellow Fever Epidemic

Author Affiliations
 

Harriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorJonathan D.EldredgeMLS, PhD, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for new media

 

Not Available

 

edited by J. Worth Estes and Billy G. Smith, 211 pp, with illus, $35.95, ISBN 0-88135-192-X, Philadelphia, Pa, College of Physicians of Philadelphia & Library Company of Philadelphia, Canton, Mass, Science History Publications, 1997.

JAMA. 1998;279(24):2006-2007. doi:10.1001/jama.279.24.2006-JBK0624-2-1

If Hollywood can make an enormously popular film of a disaster like the sinking of the Titanic, then it should snap up the rights to this story of tragedy, panic, and heroism in the face of death, wrapped up in a medical thriller. One of its central figures is Dr Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Surgeon General of the Continental Army, cofounder of the first American antislavery society, Treasurer of the US Mint, and the most influential medical practitioner of his day.

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