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Commentary
April 8, 2009

Conflict of Interest, Disclosure, and Trial Reports

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Services, University of Washington, and Center for Health Studies, Group Health, Seattle.

JAMA. 2009;301(14):1477-1479. doi:10.1001/jama.2009.466

When I was an assistant professor, my previous training had not prepared me for the unexpected attention that 2 articles, both from the same study, were to receive. One article provided evidence that abruptly stopping β-blockers might increase the risk of coronary events.1 The other suggested that, compared with the use of high-dose diuretics, which is now no longer recommended, the use of β-blockers might be associated with a lower risk of coronary events in hypertensive patients.2 While the news media's coverage of the risk study was transient, the pharmaceutical industry had a more sustained interest in the other publication.

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