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Quick Uptakes
March 24/31, 1999

Patient Satisfaction

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JAMA. 1999;281(12):1075. doi:10.1001/jama.281.12.1075-JQU90001-3-1

It's the personal touch that counts.

In a new study, researchers at Dartmouth Medical School have shown that providing elderly patients with customized information about their health concerns can improve their satisfaction with community medical practices.

The study analyzed responses from 1651 patients aged 70 years or older who were in the care of 45 physicians in 22 primary care practices in New Hampshire. All of the patients received a mailed survey that asked about their health problems and how well their physicians addressed those problems. The participating medical practices then were randomized so that their patients participating in the study either received additional personalized information and physician feedback or served as controls.

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