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Medical News & Perspectives
June 2, 1999

New Report Rejects Accrediting of Those Who Provide Ethics Consultation Services

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Copyright 1999 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.1999American Medical Association

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JAMA. 1999;281(21):1976. doi:10.1001/jama.281.21.1976-JMN0602-3-1

Does our ethics committee need to be accredited? Should our ethics consultant be certified? Is there a national standard for competence to conduct ethics consultation?

These questions invariably arise whenever and wherever ethics committees or consultation services are established—most often in hospitals and medical centers. A new report addresses these questions and recommends the same answer to all three: "No."

The advice offered in Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation, a report prepared by the Society for Health and Human Values–Society for Bioethics Consultation (SHHV-SBC) Task Force on Standards for Bioethics Consultation, reflects the consensus of 21 scholars representing a host of professional fields and health care organizations.

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