[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.216.242. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
The Cover
July 8, 2009

Their Audience

JAMA. 2009;302(2):125. doi:10.1001/jama.2009.980

In the southwestern United States, there are 21 federally recognized Indian villages known as pueblos. Pueblos are complexes of single family dwellings stacked one upon another and supported by thick walls made of adobe, which is a mixture of earth, water, and straw allowed to harden in the sun. Pueblos were originally built as defensive structures. They had no windows or doors but were entered by ladders through openings in the roof. Taos, in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico, is the northernmost of the pueblos and is considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States. Although the people of Taos have absorbed many influences, they have also retained the intrinsic elements of their ancient culture. They try to maintain a balance between their traditional way of life and the modern world.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×