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Books, Journals, New Media
August 18, 1999

HematologyWintrobe's Clinical Hematology, vols 1 & 2

Author Affiliations
 

Harriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorJonathan D.EldredgeMLS, PhD, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for new media

 

Not Available

 

edited by G. Richard Lee, John Foerster, John Lukens, Frixos Paraskevas, John P. Greer, and George M. Rodgers, 10th ed, 2929 pp, with illus, $155, ISBN 0683-18242-0, Baltimore, Md, Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

JAMA. 1999;282(7):697. doi:10.1001/jama.282.7.697-JBK0818-4-1

This is the tenth edition of the oldest established hematology textbook, which first appeared more than 55 years ago. The initial work, published in 1942, was the remarkable achievement of a single visionary giant of hematology, Dr Maxwell M. Wintrobe. That first edition, which can clearly claim credit for establishing hematology as a distinct subspecialty of internal medicine, was to be followed by five further editions single-handedly conceived and written by Dr Wintrobe.

With the tremendous expansion of the field, this task has gradually shifted to a multiauthor, multieditor effort. Six editors and 79 authors have contributed to the current edition. This change represents a tremendous leap over the ninth edition and an appropriate response to the pace of expansion of medical and scientific information. The 2763-page textbook has been divided into two volumes of very adequate size, which allows convenient handling of each. The book has 103 chapters ordered in a logical and practical sequence from a clinician's point of view. The partitioning of previously larger sections (in the ninth edition) into now smaller entities is very appealing to the clinician and certainly improves the definition and precision of the information. For a hematologist accustomed to light microscopy, this resolution gives the sense that the infor-mation is scrutinized at a higher magnitude.

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