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Commentary
August 5, 2009

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Male-Perpetrated Intimate Partner Violence

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb.

JAMA. 2009;302(5):562-564. doi:10.1001/jama.2009.1126

Although the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and aggression is generally well established within the literature,14 research investigating the relationship between PTSD and male-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) has only begun to emerge. Preliminary findings suggest a link between trauma exposure, PTSD symptomatology, and male-perpetrated IPV,58 which may have important clinical implications for batterer intervention programs. To the extent that IPV associated with PTSD has an etiology distinct from non–PTSD-related IPV, prevention and intervention programs may need to be tailored to address the potentially unique IPV risk factors among men with PTSD. Because of the lack of research on the association of PTSD and IPV perpetrated by women, this Commentary will focus on male-perpetrated IPV.

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