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Books, Journals, New Media
October 11, 2000

DermatologyA Clinical Atlas of 101 Common Skin Diseases with Histopathologic Correlation

Author Affiliations
 

Harriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorDavid H.MorseMS, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for new media

 

Not Available

 

by A. Bernard Ackerman, Helmut Kerl, Jorge Sánchez, et al, 661 pp. with illus, paper $125, ISBN 1-893357-10-4, New York, NY, Ardor Scribendi, 2000.

JAMA. 2000;284(14):1855-1856. doi:10.1001/jama.284.14.1855-JBK1011-4-1

This is a paperback clinical atlas of dermatology primarily authored by A. Bernard Ackerman, MD, who is also president of Ardor Scribendi, the book's publisher. In his preface, Dr Ackerman outlines a number of reasons for assembling another atlas. He stresses that pictures are fundamental to the study of clinical dermatology, yet many contemporary atlases actually include very few photographs, and most depict only white persons.

Ackerman also bemoans what he perceives as a dramatic decline in the teaching of medical dermatology. He attributes this to the rise of surgery and "cosmetology." Probably "cosmetic surgery" is intended, because a cosmetologist is a lay person who provides aesthetic skin care. It is also worth remembering that dermatology was originally a primarily surgical specialty and changed into more of a medical one with the advances in pharmacology of the 1930s and 1940s. Likewise, the revolution in technology of the last several decades has spawned a reawakening of interest in dermatologic surgery, now the most energetic arm of the specialty.

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