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Books, Journals, New Media
November 15, 2000

EthicsThe American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the AMA's Code of Ethics Has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society

Author Affiliations
 

Harriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorDavid H.MorseMS, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for new media

 

Not Available

 

edited by Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel, and Stephen R. Latham, 396 pp, $59.95, ISBN 0-8018-6170-5, Baltimore, Md, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

JAMA. 2000;284(19):2526. doi:10.1001/jama.284.19.2526-JBK1115-2-1

In 1847, the newly organized American Medical Association (AMA) adopted its first code of medical ethics. This code was transformed in the early part of the 20th century into a series of principles of medical ethics, the most recent version of which was adopted in 1980. Together with a 1990 statement on the patient-physician relation and a series of opinions of the AMA's Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, these principles (and the 150-year history of efforts underlying them) represent one of the most notable examples of a profession's attempt to regulate itself by self-imposed ethical standards. This effort deserves serious attention, and the book under review is an important contribution.

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