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Commentary
July 14, 2010

Learning Accountability for Patient Outcomes

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and Surgery, School of Medicine, and Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, and School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

JAMA. 2010;304(2):204-205. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.979

Each year, an estimated 100 000 patients die of health care–associated infections, another 44 000 to 98 000 die of other preventable errors, and tens of thousands more die of diagnostic errors or failure to receive recommended therapies.13 Physicians are overconfident about the quality of care they provide, believing things will go right rather than wrong, assuming they provide higher-quality care than the evidence suggests, and thinking they alone have sufficient knowledge and skills to provide care.

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