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JAMA 100 Years Ago
November 17, 2010

ROSES INSTEAD OF TAGS

JAMA. 2010;304(19):2185. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.1640

We are becoming accustomed to the use of the little stamps sold at Christmas time, the proceeds of which go to aid in the eradication of tuberculosis. In many of our cities “tag day” has become an established institution as a means of raising money for local charities. These methods of raising funds for worthy causes have been accepted by the public to such an extent that on a recent “tag day” in one of our large cities, it was practically impossible by evening to find any one on the down-town streets who did not wear a little pasteboard tag as an evidence of contribution to the designated charities. While our methods are effective so far as results are concerned, our European neighbors have evidently improved on the American plan, from an esthetic standpoint. Laurence Sterne observed, long ago, in another connection, that “they do these things better in France.” Evidently, Belgium has profited by intercourse with her artistic neighbor. A dispatch from Brussels states that the fight against tuberculosis in that country is aided by a “rose day,” on which occasion the rose de la reine is the decoration which everyone is expected to wear. Sunday, the queen's day, is designated as rose day and hundreds of thousands of little roses, sold for the benefit of the Oeuvre contre la Tuberculose, are seen in buttonholes and on dresses and hats. One of the three rose bazaars in Brussels sold this year over 150,000 roses and would have sold more had it been possible to secure them. This plan of raising funds for a worthy object is practically the same as ours, but the substitution of the rose for the pasteboard tag is a beautiful improvement which is commended to our charity workers for consideration.

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