February 4, 1998

Strategies for Stemming the Tide of Antimicrobial Resistance

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology and Medicine, University of Toronto, and Mt Sinai Princess Margaret Hospitals, Toronto, Ontario (Dr Low), and the Infectious Diseases Division, University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville (Dr Scheld).

JAMA. 1998;279(5):394-395. doi:10.1001/jama.279.5.394

Antimicrobial resistance is a rapidly emerging global problem. Appropriate antibiotic use is an essential component of any program to prevent and control resistance. However, even if indiscriminate use of antibiotics in humans, animals, and farming were curtailed today, there would still be intense selective pressure for the emergence of bacterial resistance from discriminate use.1,2 Therefore, to develop more encompassing control strategies, it is essential that physicians understand all those factors that favor the evolution of resistant strains and facilitate their dissemination.