[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Viewpoint
June 25, 2014

Banning the Handshake From the Health Care Setting

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California
  • 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California
  • 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California
  • 4Clinical Epidemiology and Infection Control, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California
JAMA. 2014;311(24):2477-2478. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.4675

The handshake represents a deeply established social custom. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of hands as vectors for infection, leading to formal recommendations and policies regarding hand hygiene in hospitals and other health care facilities.1 Such programs have been limited by variable compliance and efficacy.1,2 In an attempt to avoid contracting or spreading infection, many individuals have made their own efforts to avoid shaking hands in various settings but, in doing so, may face social, political, and even financial risks.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×