[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.48.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
Books, Journals, New Media
April 8, 1998

AIDS and RightsHuman Rights and Public Health in the AIDS Pandemic

Author Affiliations
 

Harriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorJonathan D.EldredgeMLS, PhD, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for softwareHarriet S.MeyerMD, Contributing EditorJonathan D.EldredgeMLS, PhD, Journal Review EditorRobertHoganMD, adviser for new media

 

Not Available

 

by Lawrence O. Gostin and Zita Lazzarini, 212 pp, $29.95, ISBN 0-19-511442-6, New York, NY, Oxford University Press, 1997.

JAMA. 1998;279(14):1121-1122. doi:10.1001/jama.279.14.1121

The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic has occasioned frequent and varied debates about human rights, public health, and the sometimes difficult conflicts that arise between them. At times, these interests are complementary, at times, there is indeed an irreducible conflict between competing, legitimate agendas. It is not surprising, however, that such dilemmas arise in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS, given the basic dynamics of an epidemic in which private behavior has significant public consequences. This fundamental contradiction has engendered many debates, since early in the epidemic, over issues of confidentiality vs disclosure, voluntary vs mandatory HIV testing, and the limits and obligations of partner notification, epidemiologic surveillance, and risk reduction interventions in high-risk populations.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×