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Editorial
April 15, 1998

Drugs and Adverse Drug ReactionsHow Worried Should We Be?

Author Affiliations

From the Deparment of Clinical and Quality Analysis, Partners Healthcare Systems, Boston, Mass.

JAMA. 1998;279(15):1216-1217. doi:10.1001/jama.279.15.1216

Physicians can hardly pick up a medical journal or a newspaper today without reading about some new medication, and how it promises to completely change the course of a disease or relieve some troublesome symptom. Indeed, the wonders of pharmacology are numerous. It is clear, for example, that after a myocardial infarction patients will live longer if they take β-blockers 1 and that patients with congestive heart failure live longer and feel better when they take angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.2 However, medications are a double-edged sword.

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