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JAMA 100 Years Ago
April 22/29, 1998

THE FREQUENCY OF APOPLEXY AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ITS PREVENTION AND ESCAPE FROM FATALITY.

Author Affiliations
 

Edited by Brian P. Pace, MA, Assistant Editor.

JAMA. 1998;279(16):1312. doi:10.1001/jama.279.16.1312

BY ELMER LEE, A.M., M.D., PH.B.

It is rare that an animal dies of apoplexy, but man's days are frequently ended by this disease, coming upon him generally later than the age of 50. The contrast between the simple life of the animal and the complex one of the man is in favor of the former, so far as it relates to health. At the beginning, the young animal and the child are on the same natural footing, both are nature's sweet and innocent children. Little by little the child grows away from dependence upon natural methods for its guide, substituting the artificial as life advances and ever becomes more complex. . . .

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