August 20, 2014

From JAMA’s Daily News Site

Author Affiliations

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA. 2014;312(7):686. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.10096

Increases in global temperatures and greenhouse gas emissions may put more people at risk of developing kidney stones, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed medical records for more than 60 000 adults and children treated for kidney stones between 2005 and 2011 in 5 US cities. They then compared the records with weather data from the National Climatic Data Center.

The investigators found that the risk of developing kidney stones increased during the study period when mean daily temperatures rose above 50°F (10°C) in all the cities except Los Angeles. Mean daily temperatures reaching 86°F (30°C) were linked with risk increases of 38% in Atlanta, 37% in Chicago, 36% in Dallas, and 47% in Philadelphia compared with 50°F (10°C).

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