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Contempo 1999
October 27, 1999

Recent Advances in Basic Obesity Research

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Unit on Growth and Obesity, Developmental Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Dr J. Yanovski), and Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (Dr S. Yanovski), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

 

Edited by Thomas C. Jefferson, MD, Contributing Editor.

JAMA. 1999;282(16):1504-1506. doi:10.1001/jama.282.16.1504

More than 50% of US adults are overweight, with a body mass index of more than 25 kg/m2 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters).1 Even more concerning, the percentage of Americans who are obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) has increased by more than 50% in the past 20 years, and the number of overweight children has doubled.2 Most overweight individuals can successfully lose some of the weight, but the majority regain that weight within 5 years.3

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