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JAMA 100 Years Ago
February 16, 2000

CONCLUSIONS REACHED AFTER A STUDY OF TYPHOID FEVER AMONG THE AMERICAN SOLDIERS IN 1898.

Author Affiliations
 

JAMA 100 Years Ago Section Editor: Jennifer Reiling, Editorial Assistant. Guest Editor: Howard Markel, MD, PhD.

JAMA. 2000;283(7):852. doi:10.1001/jama.283.7.852

ORATION ON STATE MEDICINE BEFORE THE FIFTY-FIRST
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL
ASSOCIATION AT ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.,
JUNE 5-8, 1900.

BY VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, M.D.
ANN ARBOR, MICH.

It is well known that typhoid fever prevailed extensively among American soldiers assembled at state and national encampments during the brief war between the United States and Spain in 1898. In August of that year a board, consisting of Major Walter Reed, U. S. A., Major E. O. Shakespeare, U. S. V., and the writer, was appointed at the request of the Surgeon-General of the U. S. Army, for the purpose of ascertaining the causes of the existence and spread of typhoid fever in the national encampments, and of suggesting means of its abatement. . . . These conclusions I will proceed to give:

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