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The Cover
March 1, 2000

Carnival in Arcueil

Author Affiliations
 

The Cover Section Editor: M. Therese Southgate, MD, Senior Contributing Editor.

JAMA. 2000;283(9):1107. doi:10.1001/jama.283.9.1107

He is an American artist who spent well over half—nearly 50 years—of his long life painting and drawing in Germany. For 14 of those years, he was one of the leaders of the Bauhaus. He exhibited with Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group in 1913 and, in 1924, along with Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, and Alexi Jawlensky, founded Die Blauen Vier (The Blue Four). He spent much of World War I in a detention camp near Berlin, where, he wrote to his wife, he was "driven almost mad by the limitation of my freedom." In 1937, nearly 400 of his works were confiscated by German authorities, and 22 of them were included in the infamous "Degenerate Art" exhibit mounted by the Nazi government to ridicule modern art and artists.

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