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Editorial
May 3, 2000

Child Injuries and Fatalities From Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle CrashesCall for a Zero-Tolerance Policy

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 2000;283(17):2291-2292. doi:10.1001/jama.283.17.2291

Alcohol is perhaps the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. Its many health effects, both adverse and beneficial, have been well documented. For example, in 1998, alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes claimed 15,935 lives in the United States, accounting for 38% of all traffic fatalities.1 Two articles2,3 in this issue of THE JOURNAL highlight the particular circumstances of children who die in alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes and shed some light on the relationships of these children to the alcohol-impaired drivers who caused their deaths.

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