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October 23/30, 2002

Meeting the Challenge of Nursing and the Nation's Health

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Center for the Health Professions (Dr O'Neil) and School of Nursing (Dr Seago), University of California, San Francisco.

JAMA. 2002;288(16):2040-2041. doi:10.1001/jama.288.16.2040

The confluent issues that create the current crisis in nursing in the United States are complex, interrelated, and long-term in their nature. A number of recent studies and reports point to a common set of concerns including an aging professional population, a shrinking cohort of entry-age workers, increasing economic pressure on the hospital care setting (a large cohort of aging baby boomers who will need and demand more hospital-based care), new health care and information technology, changing nature of work in general, new life and work values for workers, and a historical sense of disenfranchisement by the general nursing population from the decision-making process in health care, particularly in the in-patient setting.13

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